Difference between revisions of "Animal Part: Human and Other Animals in the Poetic Imagination"

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Pleasantly idiosyncratic in style (for a Classics professor!) with some first-person accounts of the author’s own encounters with animals in nature, Payne’s book explores what happens when we engage imaginatively through literature with the “being” of another. Perhaps the work in Classics that engages most directly with the post-humanist approaches to Animal Studies in other areas of literature and philosophy. - SUSAN A. CURRY
 
Pleasantly idiosyncratic in style (for a Classics professor!) with some first-person accounts of the author’s own encounters with animals in nature, Payne’s book explores what happens when we engage imaginatively through literature with the “being” of another. Perhaps the work in Classics that engages most directly with the post-humanist approaches to Animal Studies in other areas of literature and philosophy. - SUSAN A. CURRY
  
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Latest revision as of 16:37, 23 September 2016

Details

Mark Payne, The Animal Part: Human and Other Animals in the Poetic Imagination (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010)


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Pleasantly idiosyncratic in style (for a Classics professor!) with some first-person accounts of the author’s own encounters with animals in nature, Payne’s book explores what happens when we engage imaginatively through literature with the “being” of another. Perhaps the work in Classics that engages most directly with the post-humanist approaches to Animal Studies in other areas of literature and philosophy. - SUSAN A. CURRY